Top 10 Memories from 2011

We had another busy year and made many memories.  It’s tough to choose just 10; but here, in no particular order, is my top 10 list:

Celebrating 80 years of nutrition education in Indiana through our Dairy Council.  Indiana dairy farmers are long time supporters of nutrition research and education for the health of Hoosiers.

Dining at the home of Jim Irsay!  We partner with the Colts to bring improved nutrition and fitness experiences to Indiana school students.  That partnership yielded an invitation that I was thrilled to accept and gave me a rare opportunity to chat with Mr. Irsay about our Fuel Up to Play 60 program.

Celebrating 100 years of Indy car racing at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.  Indiana dairy farmers and the racing fraternity have a special bond:  milk.  We produce it.  They drink it to celebrate winning the Indianapolis 500 Mile Race.  That’s why, in Indiana, we know that Winners drink milk!®

Helping our two dairy farmer milkmen get ready to present the famous bottle of milk in Victory Circle following the Indianapolis 500.  This year I was very close to the action!  How exciting!

Attending our annual Dairy Summit.  More than 250 registered dietitians and school nutrition professionals came to the conference to learn from experts about the new dietary guidelines, the benefits of flavored milk at school and chocolate milk as a sports recovery drink.

Visiting several dairy farms during the Kentuckiana Dairy Exchange in Indiana.  Each year, dairy farmers from Kentucky and Indiana get together to tour farms and swap ideas.  We have a varied and vibrant dairy industry in Indiana and it was great to spend some time on several fascinating farms.

Watching Diane Ruyack receive her 35-year service award at our annual meeting.  I’ve had the privilege to work with Diane for many years and was so grateful to see her be recognized for a long career sharing the good nutrition news about dairy products on behalf of Indiana’s dairy farmers.

Unveiling the cheese sculpture at the Indiana State Fair.  For several years, we’ve brought Sarah Kaufmann, cheese sculptor, to our great state fair to create a work of art from huge blocks of cheese delighting thousands of fair-goers!

Hosting Dairy Day at Victory Field.  We entertained Indiana dairy farmers at the beautiful ball park in June.  It was a great time for visiting and showcasing dairy at the ball game.

Announcing that 2012 is the Year of Dairy Cows at the Indiana State Fair!

Family Reunions: Food, Fun and Memories

We’re getting ready for the 110th Artley Family Reunion.  Our branch of the family is hosting the event this year in Middlebury, Indiana.  Lots of preparations are being made, the media have been alerted and the invitations have gone out.  We have games planned and are looking forward to visiting with family members we only see at this event.

One of the most important aspects of summer reunions and picnics is the food.  It is critical to keep hot foods hot and cold foods cold while serving at these gatherings.   We’re making memories and we want them to be happy ones!

Find food safety tips at www.befoodsafe.gov.   USDA reminds us about the four steps to food safety:  Clean, separate, cook, chill.

Clean:  Keep hands clean.  Wash before and after handling food and after using the restroom, touching pets, etc. Wash with soap and warm water for 20 seconds.

Separate:  Keep foods separate.  Use one cutting board for fresh produce and another for raw meat, poultry and seafood.

Cook:  Cook foods to the proper temperature and keep them hot—140 degrees F. while serving.  Use a heat source like a chafing dish, warming tray or slow cooker.

Chill:  Cold food should be kept at 40 degrees F. or less.  Keep food cold by nesting dishes in bowls of ice or use small serving trays and replace them often.· Perishable food should not be left out more than 2 hours at room temperature (1 hour when the temperature is above 90 °F).

Reunions Magazine www.reunionsmag.com recommends replacing empty platters with freshly filled ones on buffet lines.  Don’t add food to the serving dishes that have been sitting out.

Dorothy Viola’s Favorite Potato Salad

(With a twist:  Greek yogurt and sour cream)

Ingredients

  • 3 1/2  pounds potatoes, peeled and chopped
  • 1 1/2 pounds sweet potatoes, peeled and chopped
  • 10 eggs
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 2 cups celery, chopped
  • 1 cup plain Greek yogurt
  •  ½ cup sour cream
  • 1/3  cup mayonnaise
  • ¼ cup mustard
  • ¼ cup pickle relish
  • 1 Tablespoon celery seed
  • 3 large stems fresh rosemary, strip leaves from stems
  • course black pepper
  • celery salt
  • fresh parsley for garnish

Directions

  1. Place the potatoes and sweet potatoes in a large pan of water and boil over medium-low heat until tender, about 12 minutes. Drain the potatoes, and place in the refrigerator to cool.
  2. Place the eggs in a saucepan of cold water over medium heat, and bring to a full boil. Turn off the heat, cover the pan, and allow the eggs to sit in the hot water for about 15 minutes. Cool the eggs thoroughly under cold running water and shell them. Chop the cooled eggs and place them in a large salad bowl.
  3. Stir the onion, celery, yogurt, sour cream, mayonnaise, mustard, pickle relish, celery seed and fresh rosemary leaves into the eggs, and let the mixture chill in the refrigerator at least l/2 hour to blend the flavors. Mix in the chilled chopped potatoes, and refrigerate for at least 1/2 hour.  Season with course black pepper and celery salt to taste.  Garnish with fresh parsley.  Serve cold.

100 and 80 and 70+

Born out of a commitment for service, matured through the processes of service to health and education, the dairy industry developed and nurtured what is known today as the Dairy & Nutrition Council of Indiana, Inc. 

Those words written thirty years ago evoke strong feelings.  Looking back and reading those words once again, I feel the intense pride in our Indiana dairy farm families that I felt thirty years ago while putting together the program for the Northern Indiana Dairy Council’s 50th anniversary!   My pride stems from knowing Indiana dairy farm families’ dedication to providing, not only good food, but a gold-standard nutrition education program as well.

2011 marks the 80th anniversary of the organization known today as Dairy & Nutrition Council, Inc.  Our materials and programs look different from those of 80 years ago, but our reliance on sound science has never changed.  We continue to work with health professionals, educators and the media delivering current, peer-reviewed nutrition science and information along with practical tips to make a difference in the lives of Hoosiers.

One of the first health messages, 80 years ago, to school children was presented on a book mark:  Eat 3 meals daily including at least ONE GLASS OF MILK WITH EACH MEAL.  Today we are part of Fuel Up To Play 60, a nation-wide nutrition and fitness initiative in more than 70,000 schools across America empowering students to make healthy food and fitness choices.

Our Indiana dairy farm families didn’t stop at nutrition education.  They also nurture and support promotion programs.  The most notable being Winners Drink Milk®, the marketing and public relations efforts around the storied ice cold Drink of Milk in Victory Circle, following the Indianapolis 500 Mile Race.

2011 marks the 100th anniversary of the first running of that greatest spectacle in racing!  The tradition of drinking milk to celebrate winning the Indy 500 got its start 70+ years ago.  When legendary race driver Louis Meyer pulled into Victory Lane at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway on Memorial Day 1933 and asked for a cold glass of buttermilk to quench his thirst after 500 grueling miles a tradition was born.  For more than 70 years the drink of milk tradition has remained an endearing part of Indianapolis lore.  In 2005 the drink of milk tradition was named the sports world’s coolest prize by Sports Illustrated on their website.

Today, dairy farmers who serve as directors on the board of Milk Promotion Services of Indiana are selected, in teams of two, to deliver the ice cold milk to the winning driver on race day, helping him or her re-hydrate, refuel and refresh.

Spreading the Good News

Guest Post by Indiana Dairy Princess Elles Niessen

Hello my name is Elles Niessen and I am this year’s Indiana Dairy Princess. Part of my responsibilities as the Indiana Dairy Princess is to attend different events and spread the good news about dairy.

On October 23rd, I attended an annual ‘Fairy on a Dairy’ event sponsored by the Kelsay Dairy Farm. My attendance at the Kelsay Dairy Farm was greatly enjoyed. Little girls in adorable tutus and wands showed up ready to learn about the Fairy who was saving ‘Buttermilk Hollow’ with one dairy product at a time. The kids all loved the story and were very attentive and eager to learn how these dairy products are very important for their health.

After finishing up the story, we all went on our adventures parade through the barns with the wands they were given. They also were able to go on a princess hay ride, which they all enjoyed. The kids were wonderful to be around.  After spending time with them, it was clear to me that I am leaving a mark behind and perhaps changing their view on dairy and dairy farming. I am promoting the importance of dairy and want to have a positive impact on these girls.

Being the 2010 Indiana Dairy Princess has been great, because with this specific event, I have seen my influence on these bright young kids. They wanted to learn and listen, and were honored to be around a “real” princess. One of the parents actually approached me after the program to thank me on helping her daughter get involved and not be so shy and timid with the other kids and myself.

Also in the month of November I attended the Indiana State School Music Association (ISSMA) in Indianapolis at the Lucas Oil Stadium.  This event was sponsored by the Indiana Dairy Farmers and it was a great honor to attend. I was able to hand out awards and of course an ice cold glass of milk to all the hard working band members after an intense performance. This glass of milk refueled them by not only providing them with a source of rehydration but helped their body retain, replenish and rebuild their muscle and energy. Individuals at this event couldn’t wait to drink their milk after their marching band performance and commented how good it tasted.

My next event will not be until the Fort Wayne Farm Show.

Thank you to everyone that has supported my efforts in promoting and protecting the image of dairy!

On the Farm

By Deb Osza
One of the activities I enjoy most about my job is getting to visit dairy farms. I love animals and cows are one of my favorites. This week, our team visited Four-Leaf Clover Dairy in Geneva Indiana. The dairy is owned by Leontien Oostdijck – Vandelaar and her family. The Vandelaar family immigrated to America from the Netherlands and is adjusting well to life in Indiana.

Leontien and her family began operating Four Leaf Clover Dairy three years ago this month. The family operation also has 21 employees. Their primary focus is on quality. During our tour of the farm, Leontien showed us how the family cares for their cows and the land to produce high quality milk. Cows get regular pedicures at Four-Leaf Clover. Cows get a foot bath every three days and a hoof trimmer comes in once a week. The cows are in the milking parlor for about 5 to 10 minutes each session, and are milked three times a day. The cows and workers both stand on thick rubber mats during the process so everyone’s comfortable. Sand beds add to cow comfort. Cows spend much of their time relaxing in their beds. The cow’s sand beds are fluffed three times a day with new sand added once a week. The sand beds are like a day at the beach.


We also learned that this dairy is the first facility in the state of Indiana to operate under the Direct Load system, which means all that milk is pumped right from the cow directly to one of three tanker trailers parked at the facility. The really cool thing about this system is the cooling! In just minutes the milk is chilled to 34 degrees. It comes from the cow at her body temperature of about 101.5 degrees. This system also saves on water and cleaning supplies so it is very ‘green.’

When Leontien is not busy with the farm, she blogs. Check out Four-Leaf Clover Tales at http://fourleafcloverdairy.blogspot.com . She also has a cooking blog called A Farmers Recipe at http://afarmersrecipe.blogspot.com/. I tried her recipe: Boerenkool met Nootjes en Brie…I call it Kale and Mash with Nuts and Brie. Very yummy (though I’m convinced some of my family would think I’d ruined the mashed potatoes by adding Kale, nuts and brie, they would be wrong). This traditional Dutch dish is something I plan to make again. I have Kale in the fridge right now.

The Vandelaars’ are especially appreciative when people stop by to look over their dairy operation. If you can’t make a visit to the farm, visit them online at http://www.fourleafcloverdairy.com/ and E-dopt a cow! You can sign up and get a link to an 8″x10″ photo of “your” cow and a Certificate of Edoption that you can save and print. Then, you can check out the website each month to learn about ‘your’ cows’ life on the farm.

Pumpkin Recipes Perfect for Halloween!

Here are some Spooktacular pumpkin recipes I found and wanted to share with you! They would be great for Halloween!


Ingredients

For the topping:

  • 2 cups low fat vanilla yogurt
  • 1 cup raisins

For the pancakes:

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 cup 1% low fat milk
  • 2 tablespoons melted butter
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 cup canned pumpkin
  • 1/2 cup low fat vanilla yogurt

In a small mixing bowl, briskly combine vanilla yogurt and raisins until yogurt becomes looser texture. Reserve. For the pancakes, combine flour, sugar, baking powder and cinnamon in a large mixing bowl.

In a medium mixing bowl, combine milk, butter, egg, pumpkin, and yogurt, mixing well.

Add wet ingredients to flour mixture and stir until just moist. Do not overmix. Batter may be lumpy. For thinner batter, add milk. Lightly coat a griddle or skillet with cooking spray and heat on medium. Using a quarter-cup measure, pour batter onto hot griddle. Cook until bubbles begin to burst, then flip pancakes and cook until golden.

Serve warm, topped with yogurt-raisin mixture and dusting of cinnamon.

Ingredients
  • 1 (15-ounce) can pure pumpkin
  • 2 cups chicken broth
  • 3 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1 (30-ounce) bag frozen cheese ravioli
  • 1/4 cup reduced-fat sour cream
  • 1/3 cup Parmesan cheese

Place a large saucepan of water over high heat. Cover and bring to a boil. While the water is coming to a boil, combine the pumpkin, broth, sugar, butter, garlic powder, ginger, cinnamon and nutmeg in a medium saucepan and stir to combine. Place over medium heat and bring to a simmer, stirring occasionally, until the butter melts and the mixture is heated through, about 10 minutes.

When the water comes to a boil, add the ravioli and cook according to package directions. Drain and set aside. Just before serving, stir in the sour cream as desired. Serve the ravioli on individual plates, top with pumpkin sauce and sprinkle with Parmesan cheese.

 


Ingredients
  • 1 can (14 ounces) pumpkin, chilled
  • 3 ounces reduced-fat cream cheese
  • 1 container (6 ounces) lowfat vanilla yogurt
  • 2 cups lowfat milk
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 6 teaspoons graham cracker crumbs, optional

Place all ingredients (except graham cracker crumbs) in a blender and blend until smooth. Pour into glasses and top each serving with a teaspoon of graham cracker crumbs, if desired.


Milk Myths

You deserve to hear the real story about dairy production from those who know it best…America’s dairy farmers. With less than 2 percent of the U.S. population involved in farming today, many people don’t have the opportunity to visit a dairy farm.

Add the fact that most people are three to four generations removed from the farm, and you find a pretty big information gap. The below information from hard-working dairy men and women will help bring dairy farm practices to life.

Myth: All milk contains antibiotics, except organic.

Fact: All milk is carefully tested for antibiotics. Any milk that tests positive is disposed of immediately, and does not enter into the food supply.

  • Sometimes it’s necessary for farmers to treat cows with antibiotics when they are ill, just as humans sometimes need medication when they are sick.
  • All milk is strictly tested for antibiotics on the farm and processing plant. Any milk that tests positive is disposed of immediately and does not get into the food supply.
  • The U.S. dairy industry conducts more than 3.3 million tests each year on all milk entering dairy plants to ensure that antibiotics are kept out of the milk supply. According to the most recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) data, less than one tanker in 3,000 tests positive for any animal drug residues, including antibiotics. In those rare cases, any milk that tests positive is disposed of immediately and does not get into the food supply.
  • The milk testing system provides dairy farmers strong incentives to keep their milk free of antibiotics. Any milk that tests positive for antibiotics is immediately dumped. In such cases, the farmer responsible for the milk is required to pay for the full tanker of milk.
  • Milk and dairy products are among the most stringently regulated foods in this country.

Myth: Today’s dairy cow is treated like nothing more than a milk machine.

Fact: Dairy cows must be healthy and well cared for in order to produce pure, wholesome milk.

  • Farmers employ professional nutritionists to develop a scientifically formulated, balanced and nutritious diet for their cows. Diets include hay, grains, protein sources, and vitamins and minerals.
  • Dairy cows receive regular veterinary care, including periodic check-ups, preventative vaccinations and prompt treatment of illness.
  • The dairy industry has in place a number of initiatives that demonstrate commitment to animal well-being. The National Dairy FARM Program™ is a nationwide, verifiable program that addresses animal well-being. Third-party verification ensures the validity and the integrity of the program to our customers and consumers.
  • Dairy farmers depend on healthy cows for their livelihood.

Myth: The reason the price of milk is going up in the grocery store is so dairy farmers can get rich.

Fact: Price increases for dairy, and all foods, beverages and other goods, are tied to dramatic increases in energy/fuel, distribution, transportation, feed, and supply costs.

  • Dairy farmers only receive about 30 cents of every dollar.
  • Market forces, like demand, impact the price of milk at the grocery store,
  • Farmers are seeing a lot of cost increases in producing milk, including feed and transportation. These cost increases have left slim margins for dairy farmers in recent years.
  • Want to learn more? Click here to view our fact sheets about life on the farm.