100 and 80 and 70+

Born out of a commitment for service, matured through the processes of service to health and education, the dairy industry developed and nurtured what is known today as the Dairy & Nutrition Council of Indiana, Inc. 

Those words written thirty years ago evoke strong feelings.  Looking back and reading those words once again, I feel the intense pride in our Indiana dairy farm families that I felt thirty years ago while putting together the program for the Northern Indiana Dairy Council’s 50th anniversary!   My pride stems from knowing Indiana dairy farm families’ dedication to providing, not only good food, but a gold-standard nutrition education program as well.

2011 marks the 80th anniversary of the organization known today as Dairy & Nutrition Council, Inc.  Our materials and programs look different from those of 80 years ago, but our reliance on sound science has never changed.  We continue to work with health professionals, educators and the media delivering current, peer-reviewed nutrition science and information along with practical tips to make a difference in the lives of Hoosiers.

One of the first health messages, 80 years ago, to school children was presented on a book mark:  Eat 3 meals daily including at least ONE GLASS OF MILK WITH EACH MEAL.  Today we are part of Fuel Up To Play 60, a nation-wide nutrition and fitness initiative in more than 70,000 schools across America empowering students to make healthy food and fitness choices.

Our Indiana dairy farm families didn’t stop at nutrition education.  They also nurture and support promotion programs.  The most notable being Winners Drink Milk®, the marketing and public relations efforts around the storied ice cold Drink of Milk in Victory Circle, following the Indianapolis 500 Mile Race.

2011 marks the 100th anniversary of the first running of that greatest spectacle in racing!  The tradition of drinking milk to celebrate winning the Indy 500 got its start 70+ years ago.  When legendary race driver Louis Meyer pulled into Victory Lane at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway on Memorial Day 1933 and asked for a cold glass of buttermilk to quench his thirst after 500 grueling miles a tradition was born.  For more than 70 years the drink of milk tradition has remained an endearing part of Indianapolis lore.  In 2005 the drink of milk tradition was named the sports world’s coolest prize by Sports Illustrated on their website.

Today, dairy farmers who serve as directors on the board of Milk Promotion Services of Indiana are selected, in teams of two, to deliver the ice cold milk to the winning driver on race day, helping him or her re-hydrate, refuel and refresh.

World School Milk Day

Create a Healthier World

Celebrate the 11th Annual World School Milk Day (WSMD) on Wednesday, September 29!

What is it? An international, annual event that celebrates the importance of school milk in children’s diets. The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations actively supports and promotes it.

Who celebrates? Countries throughout the world! In the past, over 40

countries representing every continent celebrated, including Germany, India, Argentina, Australia, Canada, Ethiopia, China, Iceland, Finland, Croatia, Indonesia and Oman.

Why celebrate World School Milk Day? It’s a way to focus on helping children make healthy beverage choices and to bring our world closer

together, thereby raising children’s global awareness.

What’s more, both flavored and white milk provide calcium and eight other essential nutrients that growing children need. Research shows that children who drink milk at school are more likely to meet their daily nutrient needs.

Milk provides three of the five nutrients the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recognize as being low in children’s diets – calcium, magnesium and potassium.

How do other countries celebrate? Celebrations are unique to each country and involve children in a variety of ways. In previous years:

  • Children from across Australia entered a creative drawing, writing and photography contest. Winning entries were displayed at the Royal Melbourne Show and on Australia’s Discover Dairy Web site.
  • State-wide School Milk Clubs were launched in various schools in Gujarat, India. Eighty schools also participated in a “Milky Way to a Stronger Nation” painting competition. The best three entries received prizes from this His Holy Highness, Lalji Maharaaj Shree Nrigendraprasadji.
  • Over 6,000 children in China participated in an online nutrition competition that had 15 percent of the questions related to milk.
  • Two daylong dairy carnivals in Lahore and Karachi, Pakistanused fun-filled activities that highlighted the benefits of drinking milk to launch a School Milk Ambassador Program.
  • In Zagreb, Croatia, children gathered in the main square to celebrate milk with pictures, songs, and milk and dairy foods tastings.
  • Milk was distributed to over 3,600 children in Oman.

Looking Back… Indiana State Fair 2010

Elles Niessen, the 2010 Indiana Dairy Princess, is our guest blogger today. We hope that you enjoy learning about her memorable experiences at the Indiana State Fair.

            I realize that the Indiana State Fair has been over for almost a month, but I still want to share my experiences

Elles, second from right, at Indiana State Fair Dairy Show.

from it since I’ve attended it every year since I was in the 4th grade. To make it even better, this year I got to experience it as the 2010 Indiana Dairy Princess. First, I had the privilege of helping hand out ribbons and welcoming everyone to both dairy shows during the State Fair this year. I was also able to attend one of the milking events where we taught the public about the milking process and allowed them to ask questions about it and dairy cows in general. Every day at the state fair, I met and interacted with many new people who share a love for the dairy industry and try a variety of dairy products, like fried butter. For example, I attended the ice cream crank off in the Pioneer Village and taste-tested all of the different homemade ice cream flavors, like chocolate covered strawberry. Yum!

            Not only did I get to experience that event, but I also welcomed and educated the public about the importance of consuming three servings of milk and other dairy products every day while standing outside of the Dairy Bar. I was handing out “I love milk” stickers to kids when an adult asked if she could have some to take home to her grandchildren. This is when I thought of the idea to propose her with a DAIRY question to make her earn the stickers

Elles & Buttercup in the daily State Fair parade.

while engaging her dairy knowledge. It actually turned into a fun game for those waiting in line, while also getting them involved and testing their knowledge one person at a time J . The Dairy Bar also provided me with plenty of milk shakes and grilled cheese sandwiches to keep me on my feet, especially for the evening parade. In the parade, I rode the float with my side kick, Buttercup the Cow. It was probably my favorite part of the State Fair because people knew we were promoting the dairy industry with our logo “Winners Drink Milk.”

            The whole fair experience was great, and I probably had my picture taken over twenty times. I know that there were many girls there who dream of becoming the Indiana Dairy Princess when they get older. Even though you may think I helped the public become more knowledgeable about the dairy industry, I believe this was a great learning experience for me. I only showed Holstein cows and heifers at my county fair, so this opportunity gave me the chance to learn many valuable things about judging different dairy breeds and the specific details judges look for in larger shows like that at the State Fair. I enjoyed my experience greatly and hope to see many more people at Kelsay Farms on October 23rd, where I will next be seen following through with my legend!

Local Cheeses Well Represented in Indiana!

Cheese and wine just make everything better!  Don’t you agree?  Before I came to the American Dairy Association of Indiana (ADAI), I enjoyed many imported cheeses made from a variety of animal milks, such as the creaminess of the buffalo mozzarella, the sharpness of aged goat cheese, and the saltiness of sheep’s milk feta. Each has their own history and culture.

The longer I work at the ADAI; I get to enjoy more domestic cheeses, rich in heritage, flavor, and passion.  Yes, passion.  I have even had the opportunity to help develop the Gouda that is sold during the Indiana State Fair.  It is made by Swissland Dairy which is owned and operated by Mary and Kirk Johnson Berne, Indiana.  Using this delicious, creamy, buttery cheese on grilled cheese sandwiches at the fair has allowed thousands to enjoy a new cheese variety that can be easily added to their home menu in salads, sandwiches, appetizers, pizzas and on the grill! 

Deutsch Kase Haus is another local Dairy that prepares the Dairy Bar’s staple of Colby at the Indiana State Fair!  The ‘mini horns,’ as they are called, arrive and are sliced almost immediately because we can’t wait to get that first taste!  It’s golden color and mild taste when joined by wheat bread is a perfect adult version of the grilled cheese sandwich.  Some of you may also be familiar with their luscious butter cheese or veggie cheese.  It’s just another Hoosier secret you will want to learn more about while traveling Indiana this Fall.

Fair Oaks Farms has pepper Harvarti cheese which is just fabulous.  Using their own award winning recipe, they have created a cheese that is incredible with salads, potatoes, grilled steaks, or simply with wine and fresh bread!  If you are traveling North or South on I-65, this is definitely a must taste!

Indiana truly has its share of Hoosier cheeses as there are many local cheese makers creating fine artisan products that are available locally and online.  Some of the farmers markets also have a wonderful variety of choices to enjoy. 

What is your favorite domestic cheese? If it is locally made, who is your favorite cheese artisan?

Idea Swap: Kids, Nutrition, & Exercise

Today is National Swap Ideas Day.  It used to be that idea swapping occurred between neighbors while visiting over the fence.  Oftentimes, recipes were the ideas being swapped.  However, today’s communication technologies make that quaint scene seem a little nostalgic, but it’s not completely gone.  While I don’t even have a fence in my yard, I still get some good ideas from my neighbors, whether it’s about cooking or gardening or any other topic.

To keep this from going all over the place, we’re going to narrow the topic of our “swaps” to how to get children to eat healthier foods and do more physical activity.  September marks National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month; hopefully this holiday doesn’t become a permanent part of our calendars.  First Lady Michelle Obama has taken this cause under her wing, and has brought many folks along with her.  The National Dairy Council and the NFL’s collaborative school wellness program – Fuel Up to Play 60 – is one such player.

Now back to swapping ideas!  I’ll start things off with some of my ideas that I’ve acquired over the years.  One thing about nutrition that I grew up with was always having milk with meals.  There was no other option for my siblings and I – it was just a given.  And it was great!  Eating breakfast was also a must.  Again, it wasn’t something to argue about, it was just known that every morning began with breakfast.  One other blast from the past that can still be incorporated today goes back to treats.  Many moons ago when my parents went out on a Saturday night and our babysitter was there, my sister and I got to share one bottle of Coke™.  That was when it came it 16 oz. glass bottles, and boy, did it taste good!  But half of that bottle was plenty, and knowing that there was no more when it was gone, made it even more special.  How about serving fruit as dessert?  I could go on and on, but let’s hear from you! What are your ideas for kids’ nutrition?

We also need to talk about physical activity for all of us, but especially for kids. For a variety of reasons, kids don’t tend to have access to much physical activity at school on a daily basis.  But, getting kids to be physically active for 60 minutes a day is one of the components of Fuel Up to Play 60.  The “60” doesn’t have to be all at one time.  Getting ten minutes here and fifteen minutes there (of physical activity) can really add up over the course of a day.  Some easy ideas include taking the stairs instead of an elevator or escalator, riding a bike to a friend’s house instead of being driven, or even seeing how many sit-ups you can do during a TV commercial break. Now I know there are more creative minds out there – what are your ideas?  You could win a prize!!

So, share your ideas about how to get kids to eat healthier foods and do more physical activity by adding a comment to this post. Then, on Tuesday (9/14) we’ll have a drawing* and 10 lucky people will win a physical activity prize pack!

 *1 drawing entry per blog comment posted.

Milk the Moment at the Indianapolis Children’s Museum

My name is Anna Armstrong and I am working at the Dairy and Nutrition Council of Indiana for my first rotation as a dietetic intern from Purdue University. I have enjoyed my first couple of days helping out with the Milk the Moment and “got milk?” promotional programs at the Indianapolis Children’s Museum. It was so much fun wearing my new, pink “got milk?” shirt while passing out information about the importance of drinking milk. We talked with lots of parents and their children, who stopped by our table to win a football which promoted the “Fuel Up to Play 60” program, get their picture taken with a real milk mustache, and have a free sample of milk with a crazy straw.

The kids loved getting free things and the parents loved the fact that we were encouraging kids to be active and drink milk! My favorite part was seeing how excited some of the kids got when we gave them a crazy straw to use when drinking their milk. Most of the children were young and not yet in school, but they all were excited for milk and their parents were eager for their kids to have milk as a snack. It was a great hook to help people remember to use their new straw to get their three servings of dairy each day. Some parents said their children didn’t like milk so we suggested that they work to include other dairy sources in their diet each day. For example, including yogurt, string cheese, or even ice cream on occasion are all excellent ways to get three of dairy every day.

I enjoyed being part of an event promoting health in a way that was fun and reminded both parents and kids how important it is to build strong bones and muscles over a lifetime. Overall, I would say that the people we talked with were excited to have us there and learn more about milk, plus get delicious free samples. Getting three servings of dairy each day provides both youth and adults with nine essential nutrients, including calcium and vitamin D, to lead a healthy lifestyle. So, remember to get your three of dairy today!

Greetings from Northern Indiana Dairy Country!!

Sure seems odd to be blogging about water use when things are so very dry here right now!!  I water only 5 pots of flowers by the house here – even though things look so rough!  Neighbors’ crop field irrigation systems have been going on a frequent basis this summer.  This spring sure seemed like it could never get wetter – all of our crops were delayed by the wet and cool spring that we experienced!  Now they are drying too fast! It was so cool that my children (ages 9 + 12) and I didn’t even swim in the neighbor’s pool till late July – and now the summer is almost over – boo! 

We milk around 60 cows and our milk is sold through MMPA (Michigan Milk Producers Association) – a cooperative that services the needs of almost 2000 dairy farmers of Indiana, Michigan, Ohio and Wisconsin.  They are wonderful! 

Every day we practice water conservation on our farm! Our cows drink about a bathtub of water every day. The cow’s water comes from the same well that provides my family with our drinking water! So water is a big piece of their budget! What they drink goes in and around the cycle of milk production – what is good for the cows is good for us, you, me and our children, in the way of a wholesome, nutritious, safe, dairy product!!  Nowhere can you get such a wonderful food for your family!  

  • Economical (Price the nutrition per dollar yourself!)
  • Nutritious (Can you believe all that is available in one serving of dairy?)
  • Safe (Dairy foods are one of the most regulated foods) 
  • Delicious (milk, yogurt, cheese, cottage cheese and ice cream!)
  • Healthful (Have you seen the research that deals with chocolate milk as an after sport recovery drink – or dairy’s position in weight loss?)

Each day we wash the equipment that milks our cows – twice a day.  That water is used or recycled at least 3 times. Once to wash the equipment, once to wash the floor, walls and equipment in the milking parlor, and once to fertilize our fields, for crop production. We have a filter strip, which is a strip of grass that helps to filter out sediment along the lane of our farm.

The kids help recycle water by watering the sheep’s pasture with the water from the calf buckets and using any of the animals’ old drinking water to water flowers. They also would love to be able to conserve water by following an old saying, “yep, we shower once a month, whether we need it or not!”…..  🙂

Remember, our family lives on the same ground that produces your wonderful, healthy milk supply!!  Enjoy! 

– Sue and family